Wound healing is a complex process which is affected by metabolism-specific and immunological interactions as well as by mechanical stimulations. At the end of the healing-process of the impaired tissue, a scar usually remains.

Scar tissue is the main limitation in the most critical surgeries where one wants to maintain func­tion. After spinal surgeries or surgery of the vocal cords or of the eyeball for example, the scars being formed significantly reduce the quality of function of the respective organ and subsequently the quality of life of the patients. On the skin, postoperative scarring results not only in functional disorders by cicatricial contraction but also in cosmetic impairment.

The unique properties of the PIRL as in „PIRL-scalpel“ have great a potential to reduce the postoperative scarring by preserving the surrounding healthy tissue and consecutively reducing the functional disorders in a maximum way.

Referring to this, numerous promising findings could already be generated within the scientific cooperation between the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPI-SDM) in Hamburg and the Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf.

Different ex-vivo-studies could demonstrate that the PIRL-scalpel is superior to other clinically used laser techniques in terms of thermal damage in soft tissue and cartilage [1-6]. Thereby, even the mechanical scalpel showed a larger damage zone of the connective tissue after skin incision. Based on this minimal tissue damage, a mouse model could show that the PIRL scalpel not only cuts far superior to the mechanical scalpel and Er:YAG-Laser but also led to less scar tissue formation[7].

Currently, further wound healing studies are performed on different models. In addition to this, medical scientists and physicist are continuously adjusting and optimizing new laser applications to different medical requirements.

Publications related to wound healing:

  1. Bottcher, A., et al., A novel tool in laryngeal surgery: preliminary results of the picosecond infrared laser. Laryngoscope, 2013. 123(11). PubMed
  2. Hess, M., et al., Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser? Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol, 2013. 270(11). PubMed
  3. Jowett, N., et al., Heat generation during ablation of porcine skin with erbium:YAG laser vs a novel picosecond infrared laser. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, 2013. 139(8). PubMed
  4. Jowett, N., et al., Bone ablation without thermal or acoustic mechanical injury via a novel picosecond infrared laser (PIRL). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, 2014. 150(3). PubMed
  5. Bottcher, A., et al., Reduction of thermocoagulative injury via use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) in laryngeal tissues. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol, 2015. 272(4). PubMed
  6. Linke, S.J., et al., A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL). PLoS One, 2015. 10(3). PubMed
  7. Petersen, H., et al., Comparative study of wound healing in rat skin following incision with a novel picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) and different surgical modalities. Lasers Surg Med. 2016 Apr;48(4). PubMed
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Wound healing is a complex process which is affected by metabolism-specific and immunological interactions as well as by mechanical stimulations. At the end of the healing-process of the impaired tissue, a scar usually remains. Scar tissue is the main limitation in the most critical surgeries where one wants to maintain...